Christian Chapters: The Newcomer by Suzanne Woods Fisher

Thoroughly Historical and Wholly Enjoyable Amish Fiction

The Newcomer
by Suzanne Woods Fisher


Series: Amish Beginnings (Book 2)
Publication Date: January 31, 2017
Publisher: Revell
Length: 336pp
ISBN-13: 978- 0800727499

Related Links:
Suzanne Woods Fisher’s Website (Tons of info!)

Publisher’s Website

 

 


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Publisher Synopsis

A fresh start in the New World will test Anna’s resolve . . . and her heart.

In 1737, Anna König staggers off a small wooden ship after ten weeks at sea, eager to start a new life in the vibrant but raw Pennsylvania frontier. It’s a time of new beginnings, and for Anna and Bairn’s shipboard romance to blossom.

But this perfect moment cannot last. As Bairn grasps the reality of what it means to be Amish in the New World, his enthusiasm evaporates. When a ship captain offers him a first mate position, he grabs it. Just one more crossing, he promises Anna. But will she wait for him?

As a newcomer joins the church, Anna is torn. This man is everything Bairn is not – bold, devoted, and delighted to vie for her heart. And he is here. Bairn is not.

Far from the frontier, an unexpected turn of events weaves the lives of Bairn, Anna, and the newcomer together. When the secret is revealed, which true love will emerge?


My Review

The Newcomer is the second book in Suzanne Woods Fisher’s Amish Beginnings series. Let me assure you, since I’ve not yet read book one, Anna’s Crossing, you can pick up The Newcomer without any prior knowledge and completely enjoy it. In fact, Ms. Fisher originally wrote Anna’s Crossing as a stand alone novel. It was only after years of readers’ requests for a sequel that the tale developed into a series. And it’s only natural that readers wanted more since The Newcomer begins in late 1737, soon after a group of German Amish immigrants emigrate to the New World. Anna’s Crossing chronicles Anna’s group’s voyage to the New World, and The Newcomer tells us about their journey toward settlement.

Indeed, in many ways The Newcomer is about journeys – physical and spiritual, personal and communal. Other thematic elements include pain and loss, dealing with the past, forgiveness, freedom, family, community, leadership, faith, God’s providence, and perseverance.

A true historical novel, The Newcomer will teach you a thing or two! For instance, you might learn about ships, naturalization (there’s an interesting story about the Amish immigrants’ views on the Oath of Allegiance and the resultant changes that were made so they could take the oath in good conscience), Penn’s Woods, or about what led the Amish to leave their homeland. You might even learn a bit about Benjamin Franklin: Good ol’ Ben appears in the novel, working as a printer in Philadelphia. You’ll really enjoy his character and his wit, including the wise sayings of his alter ego Poor Richard — and their German counterparts (and possible origins). One of my favorite proverbs mentioned in The Newcomer is “Ken Rose ohne Dornen,” which translates to “there is no rose without a thorn.”

On top of Mr. Franklin’s humor, a young Amish boy named Felix supplies plenty of smiles and laughs. In addition to levity, Fisher uses short chapters with brief, alternating story lines to carry her plot along without delay. The result? You’ll be turning the pages so quickly you’ll forget you’re reading historical fiction!

I certainly enjoyed my stay in early 18th century Pennsylvania. Though it was definitely not a place for the faint of heart, it’s easy to see the promise that our then young country held for those who faced oppression and possibly even danger for simply practicing their faith, as well as understand why they were willing to endure hardship and combat fear to secure their religious freedom.

— Dawn Teresa

Verdict

4.5 of 5 Hearts. Thoroughly Historical and Wholly Enjoyable Amish Fiction.

With her latest novel, The Newcomer, Suzanne Woods Fisher has successfully accomplished several ticklish feats. She has written an engrossing sequel that also reads perfectly well as a stand alone; her novel is thoroughly researched yet fast-paced and easily read; she’s crafted likeable and memorable characters (some of whom are even based on real people!); and she’s tied it all together in a beautiful bow that teaches her readers about faith and leaves them with an uplifting message: “There is always something to fear. There always will be. But God will be with us wherever we go.”

*Disclosure of Material Connection: I would like to thank Revell Reads for providing me with a copy of this title. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

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